Monday, September 25, 2017

Miniature Life



Since 2011, Tatsuya Tanaka has been creating miniature dioramas from ordinary household items (and often from food, which seems like a growing genre within the art).  His work has gained great popularity recently with an annual calendar, and now a photo book.  Check out these outstanding pieces.




























Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Photo Studio complete with Bathing Beauty Cut-Outs



Reprinted from Colossal


An Historically Accurate 19th Century Photo Studio Built in 1:12 Scale by


Turkey-based artist Ali Alamedy had been building miniature sets for seven years when he came across documentation of Charles Miner's photography studio from the early 1900s. Inspired by the way sunlight was used to illuminate studio sets, Alamedy decided to build his own version in 1:12 scale. The project took him over nine months, using hundreds of feet of wood, and building more than 100 miniature objects designed specifically to fit the era.
Due to few images being available of photography studios at that time, Alamedy read extensively to figure out what tools, techniques, styles, and colors were used within the studios (all images were in black and white). One of the hardest challenges during the completion of the model was the camera, as each fold in the bellow in real life is just 3 cm. The final 1:12 scale camera has 124 2 mm folds that were all meticulously created by hand.
You can take a look at more of Alamedy’s miniature scenes on his Instagram and Facebook. (via PetaPixel).































Saturday, October 15, 2016

Books!


Miniature books. Can't wait to make more.

Beatles Anthology
X-Ray, Francios Nars
Bidgood, Bruce Benderson
Life Guard on Duty, Matt Albiani
Arguably, Christopher Hitchens
Okavango, Frans Lanting








(back)

(front)


Hitch!




 Cleaner and more organized than my real apartment






Thursday, October 13, 2016

Ghost Army, just in time for Halloween



Today's New York Times has an article about Russia inflatable arsenal. However, it is not a new idea. The allies in World War II used them very effectively. Designer Bill Blass was part of the 23rd Headquarters Special Troops, which designed visual and sonic decoys to distract the enemy.